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numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I saw one yesterday: EntrepreNurturer (yes it even had the obnoxiously capitalized N like that).

itera wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

itera wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

itera wrote:

cgottuso8190 wrote:

itera wrote:

I once saw a resume come across my desk with   “Joe Smith, CFA Candidate” across the top.

I felt like puking. and didn’t read much after that.

On a related note, is a LinkedIn profile with “Dennis Rodman, CFA” cringeworthy in your opinion?  And on a resume?

I’ve heard differing opinions - some insist that it should be included under education or certifications only.

No, not at all. If you earned a PhD, MD, CFA, CPA then definitely put it behind your name.

In fact, it would appear weird to me if you had one of these and didn’t put it behind your name at the top

Im not a fan of it. It’s egotistical and arrogant imo. You are Itera, not Itera, CFA. The CFA isnt a part of your name. These PhDs put it behind their name so everyone that talks to them can think theyre so smart and high and mighty.  Makes me want to throw up when a PhD is in an argument and pulls out the “I have a PhD and you are trying to argue with me?” card. Your education shouldnt define you and doesnt make you better than anyone else. Just like one wouldnt put Itera, 4.0 GPA at harvard after their name either

If you ever move past CFA L1, become a manager, and do the hiring, feel free to judge candidates however you want.

Oh don’t worry, I plan to. Don’t see why that is relevant. All you are doing is taking a cheap shot at me because I dont have the vaunted charterholder title that you do. Typical Itera non-sensical arrogance and putting down of others. Whether I have a PhD in finance from Harvard or am in 3rd grade, it shouldn’t matter. You should debate the topic at hand and not make backhanded cheap shot comments at someone’s qualifications that have no relevance.

Of course it matters. If I’m doing the hiring, my opinion matters far more vs. The opinions of the candidates im looking at. Very simple logic. You’re just letting your immaturity cloud your judgment 

Would you not hire someone if they dont have their credentials listed after their name? The point im making is that you wanted to put me down with my lack of managerial status as opposed to discuss the topic at hand

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I think something must be amiss here. You posted on a separate thread asking about how important money was, and that you felt insecure when people who aren’t as smart as you are making more money than you. Then I read your post above, and I thought, how ironic.

numi wrote:
Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I think something must be amiss here. You posted on a separate thread asking about how important money was, and that you felt insecure when people who aren’t as smart as you are making more money than you. Then I read your post above, and I thought, how ironic.

Im about subtlety. Like I said in the other thread, I want people to admire how much money I have, not how I spend it  like a moron on flashy and dumb stuff. Likewise, I want my accomplishments to speak for themselves and not have to say “HEY GUYS, LOOK AT ME, IM A DOCTOR”

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I actually think PhD (or MD) looks a bit strange at the top of a standard resume (probably because it will be obvious from the education section), but CFA/CPA (and similar professional designations) look in place. MA/MS/MBA/JD (I have or am working on all of these) are just tacky and it’s generally people from lower-ranked schools who do this.

Although I think doctoral designations (PhD/MD) should generally be included on business cards or at the heading of an expert report, since most people don’t append them to business cards (they’ll usually be featured on the CV at the end of a long, boring expert report, and doing so reminds counse on both sides that they should be addressed as “Doctor”).

kartelite wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I actually think PhD (or MD) looks a bit strange at the top of a standard resume (probably because it will be obvious from the education section), but CFA/CPA (and similar professional designations) look in place. MA/MS/MBA/JD (I have or am working on all of these) are just tacky and it’s generally people from lower-ranked schools who do this.

Although I think doctoral designations (PhD/MD) should generally be included on business cards or at the heading of an expert report.

I agree with most of this, but why can CFA/CPA not just be in the education section like Phd, MBA, MS etc?

Vandelay Industries wrote:

kartelite wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I actually think PhD (or MD) looks a bit strange at the top of a standard resume (probably because it will be obvious from the education section), but CFA/CPA (and similar professional designations) look in place. MA/MS/MBA/JD (I have or am working on all of these) are just tacky and it’s generally people from lower-ranked schools who do this.

Although I think doctoral designations (PhD/MD) should generally be included on business cards or at the heading of an expert report.

I agree with most of this, but why can CFA/CPA not just be in the education section like Phd, MBA, MS etc?

Because professional certifications/qualifications are generally not included under education.

ETA: Also, people applying for certain positions (or when establishing qualifications) will generally have roughly equivalent levels of education, so it’s not necessary to highlight the fact you’re an MD when applying for a role as a doctor or a PhD when applying for an academic position. In some cases, it may be appropriate (PhD when applying for equity analyst role, etc.).

kartelite wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

kartelite wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I actually think PhD (or MD) looks a bit strange at the top of a standard resume (probably because it will be obvious from the education section), but CFA/CPA (and similar professional designations) look in place. MA/MS/MBA/JD (I have or am working on all of these) are just tacky and it’s generally people from lower-ranked schools who do this.

Although I think doctoral designations (PhD/MD) should generally be included on business cards or at the heading of an expert report.

I agree with most of this, but why can CFA/CPA not just be in the education section like Phd, MBA, MS etc?

Because professional certifications/qualifications are generally not included under education.

ETA: Also, people applying for certain positions (or when establishing qualifications) will generally have roughly equivalent levels of education, so it’s not necessary to highlight the fact you’re an MD when applying for a role as a doctor or a PhD when applying for an academic position. In some cases, it may be appropriate (PhD when applying for equity analyst role, etc.).

What about a “Certifications/designations” resume section?

And that is a nice point, but I still dont see why it is necessary to incude in as a part of your name as opposed to perhaps a summary section at the top

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

You want a quote?  Haven’t I written enough already???

As for the letters, they are on the business card because they are likely to be relevant to the people you give the card to. They are on the resume because the name and letters on the resume should be coherent with the card, unless the resume has a wider target audience, in which case thereby be more letters on the top of the resume (though too many letters can look like alphabet soup and work against you. 

You want a quote?  Haven’t I written enough already???

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Zing!

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Not true at all. I dont put MBA after my name, yet some people do. And if/when I do get my CFA charter I wont be putting it behind my name either

bchad wrote:

As for the letters, they are on the business card because they are likely to be relevant to the people you give the card to. They are on the resume because the name and letters on the resume should be coherent with the card, unless the resume has a wider target audience, in which case thereby be more letters on the top of the resume (though too many letters can look like alphabet soup and work against you. 

You can put it on the business card without it being a part of your name. You can have your name, then a short subtitle of “CPA with 10 years experience” or something like that. No reason it should be a part of your name

Vandelay Industries wrote:

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Not true at all. I dont put MBA after my name, yet some people do. And if/when I do get my CFA charter I wont be putting it behind my name either

I really can’t tell if your common sense scale is just so wacked out, or you are just grabbing at any argument you can no matter how absurb it is just to make an argument.

Dude, MBA after your name is not remotely close to putting CFA after your name. 

also, you previously also used the example of not putting “4.0 Harvard” behind your name , that’s also not even remotely close to putting CFA after your name either

you’re just trolling right? because ha ha .. that was a good one

Hope. It is the quintessential human delusion, simultaneously the source of your greatest strength, and greatest weakness.

itera wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Not true at all. I dont put MBA after my name, yet some people do. And if/when I do get my CFA charter I wont be putting it behind my name either

I really can’t tell if your common sense scale is just so wacked out, or you are just grabbing at any argument you can no matter how absurb it is just to make an argument.

Dude, MBA after your name is not remotely close to putting CFA after your name. 

also, you previously also used the example of not putting “4.0 Harvard” behind your name , that’s also not even remotely close to putting CFA after your name

you’re just trolling right? because ha ha .. that was a good one

No Im not trolling. Im serious. What is the reason people put CFA behind their name? To make them seem more competent and knowledgable, right? Same thing as people doing it with MBA or GPA anything like that. It’s all in an attempt to sound better and more prestigious.

Vandelay you take these things too seriously, similar to the “hanging your charter in your office” thread. I don’t think people necessarily do these things to show off and brag about how intelligent they are, it just represents their hard work and is something they’re (rightfully) proud of.

I list my national boxing title from 8 years ago on my resume, not to show off, but because it’s a part of who I am. I sacrificed most of my teenage years to earn it, and it’s something i’m proud of. I don’t go around introducing myself as africafarmer, boxing champion, similar to how most non-douchey people don’t introduce themselves as Joe Bloggs, CFA, but if it’s brought up in conversation or appropriate for the platform (i.e. linkedin and resumes) then why not take the opportunity to talk about yourself a little bit.

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Yes, it would appear that’s what’s going on here. It reminds me of this guy I once knew back in my early 20’s – dude drove around in an old-model Honda Accord, made about $35K a year doing some blue-collar job but had champagne tastes and caviar dreams. He would always criticize people and say things like, “if I drove that $80,000 Mercedes, I would NEVER put rims on it like that – how tacky,” or make dumb comments like, “how are you going to take a girl like that to a restaurant and order the Roderer, I would think that you would AT LEAST get a recent vintage Dom Perignon.”

And it was sad to listen to, really, especially when he would say these things while we were around other people that I knew were thinking the exact same thing. We were all internally cringing because we knew this character couldn’t afford ANY of what he was talking about, yet he still strutted around like he was some kind of expert on the high life. I think he actually used to also subscribe to the Robb Report also, which is preposterous when you think about it. 

"When what I'm doing isn't working, that's when I'll take your criticisms." -- Me, some time ago

bromion wrote:

I saw one yesterday: EntrepreNurturer (yes it even had the obnoxiously capitalized N like that).

Thanks for bringing the thread back to the original idea. Yes, this kind of thing bothers me tremendously. Likely, if this was a woman’s profile (I hope it was), it was paired with a soft-lighting picture of the girl in a cutesy “it’s just me” kind of picture, almost saying, look at how (sort of) successful I can be in business, and still be this Jewel-next-door, cute-as-a-button individual!

Barf.

"When what I'm doing isn't working, that's when I'll take your criticisms." -- Me, some time ago

Vandelay Industries wrote:

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Not true at all. I dont put MBA after my name, yet some people do. And if/when I do get my CFA charter I wont be putting it behind my name either

Vandi…have you earned any designation / degree that is actually a common and accepted practice to put after your name? PhD, MD, CPA, CFA? Because it seems you have only earned an MBA which is definitely not a common and accepted thing to put after your name…it is like puting Ramos, HS Diploma…or Ramos, BS / BA…You see how stupid that looks…thats how stupid putting MBA after your name looks so you shouldnt use the fact that you dont put MBA after your name as an argument…NO ONE should be putting MBA after their name. It is not the same as a PhD, MD, CPA, CFA. I think youre upset you havent earned any of the higher level degrees / designation and are talking like you have and putting down those that have because…well…2nd grade logic…youre jealous, which is fine, but stop digging yourself deeper in this hole…we can all see past you.

Ramos4rm, CFA, CAIA

kartelite wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I actually think PhD (or MD) looks a bit strange at the top of a standard resume (probably because it will be obvious from the education section), but CFA/CPA (and similar professional designations) look in place. MA/MS/MBA/JD (I have or am working on all of these) are just tacky and it’s generally people from lower-ranked schools who do this.

Although I think doctoral designations (PhD/MD) should generally be included on business cards or at the heading of an expert report, since most people don’t append them to business cards (they’ll usually be featured on the CV at the end of a long, boring expert report, and doing so reminds counse on both sides that they should be addressed as “Doctor”).

A lot of people never get that far down the résumé section to see the education section, or have more or less made a judgment already, by the time get get there. Especially since a PhD takes a substantial chunk out of one’s life, people with a PhD appear to have less work experience early on in their life. Having Ph.D. at the top can pre-signal that there’s a reason for that. And, in an academic context, Ph.D. at the top signals that someone is finished with a dissertation, rather than ABD. Early in an academic career, this distinction is important; afterwards, it tends to remain simply by convention. 

You want a quote?  Haven’t I written enough already???

Silly question, but do you need a masters to get a PhD? 

^ Not necessarily.

“I can no longer obey. I have tasted command, and I cannot give it up.”

lxwarr30 wrote:

Silly question, but do you need a masters to get a PhD? 

No. People usually do get the masters anyway, because in the same field, much of the coursework is the same and you may as well just take the extra couple of courses to get the masters. 

Also could be a backup in case you can’t finish the PhD , at least you won’t walk away with nothing. 

Hope. It is the quintessential human delusion, simultaneously the source of your greatest strength, and greatest weakness.

If you don’t have a master’s degree in the discipline already, they’ll usually force you to take courses in the discipline and give you a master’s degree as you progress.  You’re generally not allowed to start writing a dissertation in a discipline unless you have a master’s degree in the same (or possibly something very closely related).

I BA demonstrates that you can learn about a subject.  A master’s states that you have additional expertise in a specific domain of knowledge.  A Ph.D. indicates that you have the critical thinking skills to produce new knowledge in that domain that is appropriately vetted and not subject to the kinds of errors that people without training tend to make.

What that means is - yes - you need a master’s before completing a Ph.D., but many Ph.D. programs will accept you, train you for the master’s degree, and then continue you on to the dissertation and defense in one package.

You want a quote?  Haven’t I written enough already???

AfricaFarmer wrote:

Vandelay you take these things too seriously, similar to the “hanging your charter in your office” thread. I don’t think people necessarily do these things to show off and brag about how intelligent they are, it just represents their hard work and is something they’re (rightfully) proud of.

I list my national boxing title from 8 years ago on my resume, not to show off, but because it’s a part of who I am. I sacrificed most of my teenage years to earn it, and it’s something i’m proud of. I don’t go around introducing myself as africafarmer, boxing champion, similar to how most non-douchey people don’t introduce themselves as Joe Bloggs, CFA, but if it’s brought up in conversation or appropriate for the platform (i.e. linkedin and resumes) then why not take the opportunity to talk about yourself a little bit.

I have never suggest not putting it in the resume. My issue is attaching the titles to your name. People bring up their titles and attach them to their names in sitatuations that definitely dont merit it. For instance, their twitter profiles even though their twitter is for personal use and has nothing to do with their job. I have also heard people say “Hi, I am John Smith, PhD” or of course introducing yourself as Dr. is the same effect.

Destroyer of Worlds wrote:

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Yes, it would appear that’s what’s going on here. It reminds me of this guy I once knew back in my early 20’s – dude drove around in an old-model Honda Accord, made about $35K a year doing some blue-collar job but had champagne tastes and caviar dreams. He would always criticize people and say things like, “if I drove that $80,000 Mercedes, I would NEVER put rims on it like that – how tacky,” or make dumb comments like, “how are you going to take a girl like that to a restaurant and order the Roderer, I would think that you would AT LEAST get a recent vintage Dom Perignon.”

And it was sad to listen to, really, especially when he would say these things while we were around other people that I knew were thinking the exact same thing. We were all internally cringing because we knew this character couldn’t afford ANY of what he was talking about, yet he still strutted around like he was some kind of expert on the high life. I think he actually used to also subscribe to the Robb Report also, which is preposterous when you think about it. 

So you are saying that Im lying about not putting CFA behind my name?

Ramos4rm wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

bchad wrote:

Mr. VDLI wants to be subtly better than everyone else in the world. What really bothers him is how arrogant people who have obviously accomplished more than he has are. 

Not true at all. I dont put MBA after my name, yet some people do. And if/when I do get my CFA charter I wont be putting it behind my name either

Vandi…have you earned any designation / degree that is actually a common and accepted practice to put after your name? PhD, MD, CPA, CFA? Because it seems you have only earned an MBA which is definitely not a common and accepted thing to put after your name…it is like puting Ramos, HS Diploma…or Ramos, BS / BA…You see how stupid that looks…thats how stupid putting MBA after your name looks so you shouldnt use the fact that you dont put MBA after your name as an argument…NO ONE should be putting MBA after their name. It is not the same as a PhD, MD, CPA, CFA. I think youre upset you havent earned any of the higher level degrees / designation and are talking like you have and putting down those that have because…well…2nd grade logic…youre jealous, which is fine, but stop digging yourself deeper in this hole…we can all see past you.

Rightly or wrongly, there is a contigent of people that put MBA after their name. We have all seen it. I think it does indicate the ability for me to abstain from adding such titles to my name. I clearly could add it if I was really that set on addding stuff behind my name. A CFA is a masters level degree anyway, it is not a PhD, therefore it should be seen as more similar to an MBA, not a PhD, anyway

bchad wrote:

kartelite wrote:

Vandelay Industries wrote:

numi wrote:

It’s actually business convention to have PhD’s on business cards. Notwithstanding a somewhat vapid and tiresome discussion about whether it’s right or wrong to do so, I actually think that one’s negative emotional response to someone with a PhD in their professional documents has less to do with the person that has the PhD, and more to do with the person that is somehow irked by it. Seems the person who is somehow turned off by that likely has some real insecurities they need to shelter.

Why is it neccessary to have it as a part of the name? Why not just at the top of the resume? Listing it as a part of the name implies that you are better than anyone that doesnt have it as a part of their name. Ill say it again, your education shouldnt define you. Why should anyone introduce themselves as “Dr.” in a non-professional setting? For no reason other than to make others bow down to their prowess and hold them in higher esteem. The person that puts it in their name is the one with the insecurities. They feel compelled to attache their name to it in order to prove their worthniess in society

I actually think PhD (or MD) looks a bit strange at the top of a standard resume (probably because it will be obvious from the education section), but CFA/CPA (and similar professional designations) look in place. MA/MS/MBA/JD (I have or am working on all of these) are just tacky and it’s generally people from lower-ranked schools who do this.

Although I think doctoral designations (PhD/MD) should generally be included on business cards or at the heading of an expert report, since most people don’t append them to business cards (they’ll usually be featured on the CV at the end of a long, boring expert report, and doing so reminds counse on both sides that they should be addressed as “Doctor”).

A lot of people never get that far down the résumé section to see the education section, or have more or less made a judgment already, by the time get get there. Especially since a PhD takes a substantial chunk out of one’s life, people with a PhD appear to have less work experience early on in their life. Having Ph.D. at the top can pre-signal that there’s a reason for that. And, in an academic context, Ph.D. at the top signals that someone is finished with a dissertation, rather than ABD. Early in an academic career, this distinction is important; afterwards, it tends to remain simply by convention. 

So it boils down to having to feel like you have something to prove, like ive said. If one truly feels its imperative to have it at the top, have it in a career summary, not as a part of ones name. Plus, your reasoning provides no reason for why PhDs need to introduce themselves as Dr. in social situations

I have a Ph.D. (something longtime AFers know and which others can possibly read between the lines, but which I almost never bring up here, unless it’s directly relevant).  I generally wince when being introduced in public as Dr. Bchad.  I feel that I shouldn’t use the term Dr. unless I am actually able to resuccitate a patient having a heart attack on a plane.

Still, it can feel nice now and then when people call me Dr. Bchad, because it feels like someone recognizes that it took a lot of work to get where I am, but I’m never the initiator of the term “Dr.”, and I don’t have Dr. on any of my business cards.  I do have Ph.D. on them, however, and CFA (though I need to pay my dues again, darnit).

I don’t come up to people at conferences and say, “Hi, I’m Bchad, Ph.D.”  But if we exchange business cards, the card will have Ph.D. on it.  It’s not clear to me whether the resume benefits from Ph.D. at the top, though it does benefit from CFA.  Some people want to see the Ph.D. some people say hide it because weaker personalities get intimidated by it and start to feel they have something to prove.  It’s really a crap shoot as to whether it helps or doesn’t.

In the financial world, there are so many hucksters, crooks, and dressed-up dolts around, that things like CFA and CPA do communicate useful business information, as opposed to someone at the local Bank of America branch who was just hired off the street to sell the Banks’s brand of high-fee mutual fund (just look at 2013’s performance!).  With Ph.D. it’s a bit trickeir.  It matters whether the Ph.D. is in finance, economics, or literature.  I would advise not having the Ph.D. on the card if you would sound silly or irrelevant when talking about the subject matter.

Nothing means that people who don’t have these designations can’t be smart and accomplished and/or have talent too… perhaps more talent.  It’s just that they will show it in additional ways.

As you get along in your career, the designations matter less to you personally, but sometimes your organization wants to have the letters out there to hold out to their clients.  My employer wants Ph.D. and CFA on my stuff because they want materials I produce to carry the extra weight of someone who has accomplished some things that are widely acknowledged as requiring degrees of knowledge, talent, and dedication.  

I don’t mind so much, because I came to this industry late in my career and so in some ways I am behind the curve relative to people of a similar age.  For me, it’s nice to have those there because it reminds people that even if I am not as high up in the hierarchy as other people at my stage of life, it is not because I haven’t done anything with my life, or that I started at age 21 and only managed to climb this high in my career.

I think you think that having letters and designations on your business materials is arrogant, when in fact, that’s precisely what the conventions are for.  If I tried to pick up women in a bar by saying “yeah baby, I’m a charterholder and doctor!”  Yes, that would be a douchey thing to do, but that’s not what I (or even most people with designations of some sort) do.

Though, I have to admit that some women did get extra excited when I said I was a professor.  Apparently the “student seduces professor” fantasy is a pretty common and powerful one.  It was really weird one night when this middle school teacher took me home, and it was clear that what was really getting her off was this idea of doing a professor…  Fun… but weird…

You want a quote?  Haven’t I written enough already???