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Using a new offer to get a raise/promotion

Yo KK, Respect.

It’s posters like you that make the AF Brethren Proud.  

Now enjoy the two weeks off, recharge, and enter your new employer with the pedal to the metal!

KrazyKanuck, I’ve always wanted to ask you. You are Canadian but you work in the US. How did you get your first job anyways? Did you apply online and the company handled all the visas or whatever? Or did you get an American citizenship already?

^ I went to university in the US, and got my first job through campus recruiting. That company got my H1B visa, thankfully in a year there was relatively little demand (now they cap out immediately once the filing window opens and there is no guarantee you’ll get one). I’m going to have to get a green card one way or another in the next couple years though. From what my company immigration lawyers have told me, being Canadian is a benefit here because while you still have to go through the same BS as any other country, the US imposes limits on the number of green cards that can be issued to citizens of any given country. No country’s citizens can take more than x% per year (7% i think) and since Canada doesn’t have a huge number of citizens relative to other countries, you don’t have to sit in a queue for too long. Conversely if you’re from China or India, you can sit in a queue for up to, or more than a decade before you get your GC even though you’ve completed the whole rest of the process because there are just so damn many of them!

Finding employers that are willing to deal with visa sponsorship is more art than science, and once you get the initial one it’s really not that big of a hassle. 

^ Thanks for that post, its helpful. Getting tired of earning my salary in worthless loonies.

“I can no longer obey. I have tasted command, and I cannot give it up.”

So my two weeks of paid leave comes to an end today, coincidently is also pay day at former employer and I received my normal direct deposit.

In the past two weeks, I’ve played 4 rounds of golf, taken a long weekend trip to hang with my dad for the first time in nearly a year, had off the record happy hours with a couple of co-workers, and accomplished what would have normally been a month worth of errands.

That being said, I’m quite happy to be headed back to work on Monday. Back to normal (whatever that is), and ready to hit the new challenge with everything I’ve got!

Now to email HR since they are under the incorrect assumption that I don’t have any accrued PTO I’m due. I think I have 1 day and I’m going to remind them they owe me for that.

You SOB. Congrats on the new gig. Back to the grind

'A flute with no holes, is not a flute. And a donut with no hole, is a danish'

since CvM is no longer with us: “go get em lil cubbie!”

"Verdict: TRUE" - Fact Check

krazykanuck wrote:

So long story short, I have received a job offer from a company that could be considered a competitor, though not a direct competitor. I’m in the process of negotiating the details and compensation right now, but I’d be willing to stay at my current company in exchange for a solid raise and a promotion. The new offer will be a material raise in salary, but the other benefits aren’t as strong.

I’m fairly comfortable in my current role with slightly better than ok pay and great benefits, but am in lower on the totem pole ranking/title wise, and consequently underpaid, vs my peers because I started lower in the pay band even though I provide a similar level of value. Which obviously frusturates me and my bosses basically tell me to go pound sand when I bring it up. Working my favor currently is that we’re short staffed, having trouble with retention, and I’m one of the most senior guys on my team, so I’d imagine they would want to keep me.

Anybody have any experience with this? Things to do, to not do?

I recommend you be as gracious as possible and let them know what you’ve been offered very generally (no need to mention company names, $, etc). Tell them that you’ve been presented with an opportunity that is far more in-line with the value you are creating for the firm, and that while you’re intrigued by the opportunity, you also really enjoy your current position and want to find a way to make things work. Be very specific about the roles, responsibilities and $ you are seeking. Should hopefully be at least 15-20% above your alternative offer since, why not? Might as well leverage hard while you can. Prepare for them to say no and in your mind be ready to walk out if you have to, but chances are if you’re a good employee they’ll want to keep you as long as you can especially based on the circumstances you’ve outlined.

The basic thing not to do is to be rude, aggressive, cocky, etc. – but just come at it more as like, you got offered this other role and it was practically handed to you, and while you like your current role you feel somewhat confounded why the value you feel like you bring doesn’t seem to align with what you’re being paid. And now that you have another compelling offer in hand, you want to your present employer to get on the same page now or you’ll go elsewhere.

numi wrote:

Tell them that you’ve been presented with an opportunity that is far more in-line with the value you are creating for the firm

great phrasing and perspective

remember numi’s words …

“Your beliefs become your thoughts,
Your thoughts become your words,
Your words become your actions,
Your actions become your habits,
Your habits become your values,
Your values become your destiny.” - Gandhi

geo wrote:
^ Thanks for that post, its helpful. Getting tired of earning my salary in worthless loonies.

FWIW, I’m also down in the States working. I’m not on an H1B visa though, I’m on TN status which is incredibly easy to get once you have the job offer.  I think it goes without say that the tough part is to convince an employer to go through the visa process to get you down here.  

krazykanuck wrote:

ltj wrote:
I’ve seen multiple people at my firm over the years bank on the “I add value, and we’re already short staffed” expecting some type of counter offer…

I don’t doubt that many/most people claim this reason when they quit. The difference with me is it’s actually true. Not only am I the #1 person in my group by client engagement metrics (according to Salesforce) but I’m the only person with even a rudimentary understanding of an entire section of our client deliverables. They can be my guest if they want to try to figure it out without me. :)

The graveyards of full of indespensible people, but everything is still chugging along nicely. Don’t pretend you can stick it to your employer with this offer. Take it or don’t

M4tt30 wrote:

geo wrote:
^ Thanks for that post, its helpful. Getting tired of earning my salary in worthless loonies.

FWIW, I’m also down in the States working. I’m not on an H1B visa though, I’m on TN status which is incredibly easy to get once you have the job offer.  I think it goes without say that the tough part is to convince an employer to go through the visa process to get you down here.  

I look at the U.S. job numbers and our job numbers and it makes me think a few years down there might be wise. If oil is back over $50 by end of 2016, I might be forced into looking for work down there.

“I can no longer obey. I have tasted command, and I cannot give it up.”

geo wrote:
I look at the U.S. job numbers and our job numbers and it makes me think a few years down there might be wise. If oil is back over $50 by end of 2016, I might be forced into looking for work down there.

It’s not so bad, other than the health insurance aspect of things. I got down here when the dollars were on par too so I’ve essentially received a ~35% raise due to the currency alone. Obviously most of my expenses are in USD now, but paying off CAD student loans and my trips back home are pretty nice.

only do it if you’re 100% willing to walk away from your current job