Sign up  |  Log in

Career ideas

So, I think I hate making cold calls all day long to advisors - especially since I’m trying to drive asset flows for a product that can be replicated almost anywhere for an identical fee. 

Problem is I have really no idea what I want to do in finance anymore. I may have been lucky enough to clear the CFA program but won’t find out until the end of August.

Really the only thing that interests me is trading and fixed income. Ideas? What are you supposed to do when you feel lost in your career?

(Post is serious - I come to you today with my tail almost between my legs. There is no facetiousness going on here).

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

I kind of feel the same… not sure what I want to do. I    think the best thing to do is to make as much money as you can, save as much as you can (more than normal) till you figure it out. Don’t get comfortable or you will settle.

We’re gonna win so much, you may even get tired of winning. And you’ll say, 'Please, please. It’s too much winning. We can’t take it anymore. Mr. President, it’s too much.' And I’ll say, 'No, it isn’t!' We have to keep winning!

hpracing007 wrote:

I kind of feel the same… not sure what I want to do. I    think the best thing to do is to make as much money as you can, save as much as you can (more than normal) till you figure it out. Don’t get comfortable or you will settle.

What is your job by the way? If you don’t mind me asking. Barely know anything about you. 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

It’s common for people in their 20’s to feel very lost in their career.  All you see on TV and media are people living exciting lives, although in reality I hear a similar story from everyone your age and remember having these conversations a lot.  Some of it is the nature of finance, you’re honestly removed from anything exciting in a declining industry and not producing any tangible service can be taxing.  Have you done a master’s yet?

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

How about masters in data science? 

Lol fixed income is prolly more boring. Trading is exciting, but then it gets old and tedious. Plus they are turning to quants for it now. What’s funny though is for some time period people were adding alpha by buying fixed income in odd lots. When you buy in odd lots they usually trade at a discount so buying them and bundling them was a way to add alpha lol. I forgot who it was, coulda been pimco, doublefund, or during bill gross last company. 

I love my cheese. I got to have my cheddar.

Become daytrader and travel all around the world.

Fixed income is good, but you have to get into a firm that is doing total return investing.  IG has a lot more moving peices than standard equity given the need to account for more technicals, macro, rates.  HY is definitely far more interesting overall than IG.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

Nerdy - I think you’re talking about Belle Haven? I only know that because they took me out to lunch one day ;-) money managers always trying to wine/dine me - which is the plus side of my job I guess (little do they know I don’t control ****).

Black Swan wrote:

It’s common for people in their 20’s to feel very lost in their career.  All you see on TV and media are people living exciting lives, although in reality I hear a similar story from everyone your age and remember having these conversations a lot.  Some of it is the nature of finance, you’re honestly removed from anything exciting in a declining industry and not producing any tangible service can be taxing.  Have you done a master’s yet?

That’s a big ol’ no on the masters - you’re telling me, that, I need to do a masters? 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

Also, here’s more about my situation. I’m the only one who works as a “lead finder” (if you will) on my team (we’re called, Investment Specialists). 

But it’s changing me - and I fear it’s not for the better. See, everyday when I come in to work, I have to dawn a “**** YOU” sort of attitude, put on my headset, and blast some gangster rap in my headphones in the other ear. Then sit down in a chair and proceed to blast advisors for 8 hours. I think it would be different if I was surrounded by other people who were also making calls all day long - but, I’m the only one making noise on this entire side of the office, the only problem is, it’s all attention I really don’t want, but, It’s something I have to do. In other words, I have mixed feelings on the fact that other people around me get to listen to a 27 year old get rejected 99% of the time. 

It’s doing things to me. But, my boss says if I do this right, I’ll be making a killing… ? Yes?? No?

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

Here are some career ideas from my very wise and experienced friend:

1) Buy a lot of Bitcoin and hope to make $1.5 million. It won’t last too long, but it is enough to buy a BMW and a condo in LA.

2) Be a gold digger and mooch off some f-boy.

3) Have rich parents. 

4) Become a politician/mayor.

5) Win a lottery.

6) Make a music video and/or cultivate your social media presence to become an “influencer”.

7) Start a tire shop.

I think that exhausts the list of viable careers. 

“Visit the Water Cooler forum on Analyst Forum. It is the best forum.”
- Everyone

IDK how you didnt’ even think of saying owning a Pret-A-Manger or Chic Fil A

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

Why do you want out of life and your job? I’m only a few years older than you, but I refuse to do anything solely for the money. Sure it’s easy to say when I’m highly paid, but I have always chosen happiness and good lifestyle  over a bump in pay.

What activities have you done in your various jobs that you really like? Sales? Analysis? Posting on AF? 

Great list! 

Not saying you need a masters, but it helps frame your path forward.  It’s actually a positive you haven’t done it since it represents sort of a one time option value if you do it right.  The upside there being that once you settle in a bit and form a plan you feel sure of, you have the ability to lever a good masters to facilitate any transition you may need.  It’s important to recognize that the career path you’re on isn’t really building you any skills beyond sales and the longer you stay in it, the harder it will be to eventually do anything that isn’t sales (without going to some form of grad program). 

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

working at a start up is also good money cuz they pay you in ITM call options. when they ipo, what you think is worth 50k at ipo price, is really worth 250k!

anywayas i agree with raw. find out what you want in life.

I love my cheese. I got to have my cheddar.

Black Swan wrote:

Not saying you need a masters, but it helps frame your path forward.  It’s actually a positive you haven’t done it since it represents sort of a one time option value if you do it right.  The upside there being that once you settle in a bit and form a plan you feel sure of, you have the ability to lever a good masters to facilitate any transition you may need.  It’s important to recognize that the career path you’re on isn’t really building you any skills beyond sales and the longer you stay in it, the harder it will be to eventually do anything that isn’t sales (without going to some form of grad program). 

But I’m not doomed yet? But I also am doomed, because finance is dying. 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

OP, here is my attempt at serious insight into your situation. Maybe you should accept that you are not actually in finance. Sure, you might work for an advisory company, but it doesn’t seem that your actual role involves any sort of analytical purpose that requires special knowledge or skills. With this in mind, a broader variety of jobs could be considered to be a continuation of your current career trajectory.

If you are intent on progressing within the finance sort of industry, you should ask yourself first, are you in the top 1% of your current job? If not, that is where you need to be, or you really don’t deserve something better. Every single cold caller/operations/other sort of person in a financial firm complains about their current role not fulfilling their potential. Obviously, most are just not qualified for better jobs. Only a few are capable of introspective progress that helps them succeed ultimately. 

“Visit the Water Cooler forum on Analyst Forum. It is the best forum.”
- Everyone

ohai wrote:

OP, here is my attempt at serious insight into your situation. Maybe you should accept that you are not actually in finance. Sure, you might work for an advisory company, but it doesn’t seem that your actual role involves any sort of analytical purpose that requires special knowledge or skills. With this in mind, a broader variety of jobs could be considered to be a continuation of your current career trajectory.

If you are intent on progressing within the finance sort of industry, you should ask yourself first, are you in the top 1% of your current job? If not, that is where you need to be, or you really don’t deserve something better. Every single cold caller/operations/other sort of person in a financial firm complains about their current role not fulfilling their potential. Obviously, most are just not qualified for better jobs. Only a few are capable of introspective progress that helps them succeed ultimately. 

This is exactly right. The product I’m selling is a passive factor based optomization strategy (boring, ya know what I mean?). But, it’s because I don’t really “work in finance” that I’m sort of pissed off - because it IS the industry I wanted to get into. So, I did what any dumbass kid right out of college looking at the big wall street banks would have done. Enroll in the CFA program. And spare me your lectures on why that was a retarded idea, because, I completely agree with you too. I’ve literally cucked myself here. I’ve just wasted the last four years of my life chasing a piece of paper, and I am zero steps closer to working where I wanted to work. Instead, all it’s done, is “supposedly” qualify me to go pick up the phone and speak about why we changed our asset allocation within a set of customized models to FA’s. 

It’s sickening. I’m not knocking the integrity of the CFA program for one second - but, god ****ing dammit, it was the wrong move for me. On a pure money scale, I could have gone and done so many different things, and made similar money IF NOT MORE doing other career path’s. 

That’s why I’m pissed off. I don’t even know HOW to get into finance anymore. 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

Ohai/Swan - seriously though here (I’m going to come off as an ass hole about this, but like, I’m being 100). 

How in the **** does completing the CFA program not qualify someone for working in finance? Explain this to me. If it doesn’t qualify me for at least junior/entry level work, then something is seriously wrong here. Because, it’s supposed to be the best and most rigourous financial/investment-management qualification out there. Do you catch what I mean on this? 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

Why you want to work in “finance” anyway? Are people in this industry somehow more happy than other people?

Anyway, I already told you how to get into “finance”, which is be in the top 1% of your current job. If you sell 10x as many front load funds as the next best person, I guarantee that you will have doors open for you. There is a way forward by salvaging your current path. However, as I stated before, most people just don’t get it or can’t do it, and that is why they are where they are. 

The more you ignore the fact that getting ahead comes from actually being good, the more you won’t go anywhere. 

CFA doesn’t matter because it is super easy and everyone can do it. Sorry for what you thought before, but I recommend you just do not make this central to your identity. 

“Visit the Water Cooler forum on Analyst Forum. It is the best forum.”
- Everyone

ohai wrote:

CFA doesn’t matter because it is super easy and everyone can do it. Sorry for what you thought before, but I recommend you just do not make this central to your identity. 

A 20% completion rate is just about damn near a shining bastion of an antithesis to what I would call “Everyone can do it”. 

And is exactly why I would say that completing it surely would qualify you for entry level finance work - passing L1 is exactly how I landed my trade ops job. 

I know you’re cynical, but are you really THAT cynical?

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

Yeah a LOT of people pass the CFA.  It’s great, it’s nice, it helped me out in small ways I think in my career and as an individual, but I think you lack perspective on what “qualifies” someone.

This is a declining, highly competitive industry, you don’t get a sticker to go work in it like the CPA.  A lot of industries (like accounting or nursing) are centered at the median, finance is absolutely not one of those industries, it is mean driven and very tail heavy.  Your problems really began in school selection, if you want to do computer science, choose Carnegie Mellon or some tech equivalent, finance something costal like NYU, etc.

You need to be focusing on roles that offer some form of tangible hard skill that is transferable and brings you nearer to your ideal career in finance.  Ideally if you’re serious about finance, then you should be building a plan towards a full time MBA or equivalent from a target recruiting school at least in the Top 15.  Beneath that rank and your odds of successfully transitioning will slip a bit and you might be better served with like an MF degree or whatever.  But its a chicken and the egg type thing, because you’re not going Top 10 MBA with work experience cold calling people and your grades should be very strong in undergrad, particularly given that you went to a school most recruiters on the coasts are probably unfamiliar with.

You have a lot of career and time ahead of you, at some point you need to start asking questions about your realistic prospects in various paths and making moves, maybe a career change is in order.  I wouldn’t panic and flail, but forming an honest assessment and 5 year plan is crucial.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

CEO10K-DAY wrote:

ohai wrote:

CFA doesn’t matter because it is super easy and everyone can do it. Sorry for what you thought before, but I recommend you just do not make this central to your identity. 

A 20% completion rate is just about damn near a shining bastion of an antithesis to what I would call “Everyone can do it”. 

And is exactly why I would say that completing it surely would qualify you for entry level finance work - passing L1 is exactly how I landed my trade ops job. 

I know you’re cynical, but are you really THAT cynical?

Ohai is actually right and you are just really kind of clueless.  The pool of 20 thousand some odd people that sit for this is 90% people that screwed up and will never have a career in finance, who cares if 80% fail.  100% of people I know pass L1.  But people I know are intelligent.  I just really don’t think you’re grasping how competitive this field is right now or the whole mean vs median thing.  Keep in mind that most of these banks are hiring from target schools with <10% acceptance rates among far more competitive pools.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

“passing L1 is exactly how I landed my trade ops job. “

What, isn’t the whole premise that you hate your current job and don’t think it’s real finance? Sometimes I just don’t know what to say…

Anyway, I think I have stated what I think is material. You have a choice of whether to accept feedback and improve, or just keep pitying yourself and go nowhere. 

Of course I am cynical, but I also have the job you want. So I don’t think it is a completely uneducated opinion…

“Visit the Water Cooler forum on Analyst Forum. It is the best forum.”
- Everyone

ohai is right about being the best before moving onto something else. Think about how different school is from work and they still want a high gpa. And once you’re in the door for an interview your attitude can be like, I’m the best at something I don’t even want to do, imagine how good I will be working here! Rather than, I hate my job and I’m alright at it, it sucks, please hire me.

We’re gonna win so much, you may even get tired of winning. And you’ll say, 'Please, please. It’s too much winning. We can’t take it anymore. Mr. President, it’s too much.' And I’ll say, 'No, it isn’t!' We have to keep winning!

ohai wrote:

“passing L1 is exactly how I landed my trade ops job. “

What, isn’t the whole premise that you hate your current job and don’t think it’s real finance? Sometimes I just don’t know what to say…

Anyway, I think I have stated what I think is material. You have a choice of whether to accept feedback and improve, or just keep pitying yourself and go nowhere. 

Of course I am cynical, but I also have the job you want. So I don’t think it is a completely uneducated opinion…

No no no - I’m only attacking a specific part of your argument (CFA), but that is not at all relevant to the focus of my complaint. I completely agree with everything else you said - trust me. Thank you for your feedback, it’s appreciated.

I wish I could tell you the name of my firm. It might change your opinion on if I work in finance or not. Truth is, I’m in the seat that our research analysts have interviewed for in the past. Which is weird, that they let someone like me, sit in this seat while truth be told I’d like to sit in theirs. 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

CEO10K-DAY wrote:

But, it’s because I don’t really “work in finance” that I’m sort of pissed off - because it IS the industry I wanted to get into…

…That’s why I’m pissed off. I don’t even know HOW to get into finance anymore. 

…1 minute later

CEO10K-DAY wrote:

And is exactly why I would say that completing it surely would qualify you for entry level finance work - passing L1 is exactly how I landed my trade ops job. 

…5 minutes later

CEO10K-DAY wrote:

I wish I could tell you the name of my firm. It might change your opinion on if I work in finance or not.. <other blabbering>

Look if you wanted to throw a hysteric incoherent pity party only to get offended and argue against yourself then tell us upfront and stop wasting our time.

Clearly we’re not getting through here or you’re just unwilling to get it. Working in a job cold calling on random indiscriminate products isn’t doing finance its selling widgets (to your original point), regardless of the logo on the business card.  There are no hard skills.  Neither of us is fooled about the situation, but at the same time, neither of us actually care, I have no skin in this.

You asked for advice, we gave it, it wasn’t what you wanted to hear apparently, so be it.  You work in finance, your business card says so, you are set for life.  UD is Yale.  If you change your mind, what we wrote is there.  Like Ohai, I am out.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

My bad for coming across that way. I guess the point I’m trying to make is that I agree with you guys in the regard I’m not doing finance type stuff right “now”. They made me start at ground zero, I could have portrayed that better. 

But for real, my bad about the seemingly bad attitude. 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It be like that sometimes.

No worries, I’m not pissed, I just like lighting people up.  Lol.  But serious about the advice though.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

I am a little irritated I forgot to mention your point was silly.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017