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Net worth

lord of pensions and pilsner wrote:

Hey igor555.

I’m still bullish on global economic growth and earnings, so I am a buyer (of stocks) in this market. I am confident that recession is not a near-term likelihood, nor are bond yields yet a threat to the market’s earnings yield, so there is room to run for stocks in a positive direction in the US and overseas (naturally I reassess this regularly). 

On upstate New York, which is a place I love, if your house(s) are for your lifestyle and not speculation–and house(s) should be for your lifestyle, not speculation–then the real estate market is irrelevant. Also, when you own your house(s) with cash and also have a higher net worth including financial assets, it is a good feeling. Some in this forum have extolled a very rational preference to retain debt; they are very unlike me (i.e., not truly wealthy).

which stocks are you buying?

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He has a house in Westchester. That adds a lot of credibility.

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ohai wrote:

He has a house in Westchester. That adds a lot of credibility.

who else lives in Westchester? 

Be yourself. The world worships the original.

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=260199

Good news–we’re not the only confused group in the world. 

82 > 87
Simple math.

lord of pensions and pilsner wrote:

ohai: my net worth when I posted (EXCLUDING houses, of which I own two, outright with no mortgages) was $1.5m…

What is your net worth, ohai?

Ohai, you gonna leave it like that? He is calling you out for 1v1 in High Net Worth Bracket. When is weight in?

My 2 cents:  Net worth is more or less useless measure to measure one’s wealth. To give an accurate picture of one’s wealth, the ratio of net worth/annual expenses should be calculated. 

If your avg.annual spending is $5m per year and your net worth is currently $3m, I consider you poor, regardless of your high net worth. 

If your avg.annual spending is $30k per year and your net worth is currently $1m, I consider you rich (and financially independent), regardless of you lower net worth. 

As with so many other things in life, it’s a matter of perspective!

It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.

I usually exclude real estate (my primary residence and my vacation home–which I own outright–because they are consumption not investment) from my asset allocation. As a result I am and have been 100% allocated to equities. This has helped me increase my net worth to approx $2mil. Many investors do not have the stomach for that much risk, right?

TrackSuitInvestor wrote:

My 2 cents:  Net worth is more or less useless measure to measure one’s wealth. To give an accurate picture of one’s wealth, the ratio of net worth/annual expenses should be calculated. 

If your avg.annual spending is $5m per year and your net worth is currently $3m, I consider you poor, regardless of your high net worth. 

If your avg.annual spending is $30k per year and your net worth is currently $1m, I consider you rich (and financially independent), regardless of you lower net worth. 

As with so many other things in life, it’s a matter of perspective!

lord of pensions and pilsner wrote:

I usually exclude real estate (my primary residence and my vacation home–which I own outright–because they are consumption not investment) from my asset allocation. As a result I am and have been 100% allocated to equities. This has helped me increase my net worth to approx $2mil. Many investors do not have the stomach for that much risk, right?

less than a year ago it was 1.5m now you are at 2m already,

this man is the living proof of that  3/3 18months means superior results guaranteed