Sign up  |  Log in

GMAT

I’m considering taking GMAT some time this year. I’d appreciate any suggestions on which books to use for preparation, estimate of study hours, etc.

A clear and personalized study plan is here! Schweser's upgraded content and redesigned study platform are exactly what you need to pass the Level I exam. Save 10% when you preorder a Premium Package for a limited time.

I expect you’ll crush math.
Verbal is very tricky and subtle – spend 75% or more of your study time on that.

maratikus,

I have posted my debrief here. HTH

http://www.scoretop.com/GH_ShowArticle.asp?HID=102

thtz a great post …COngratz on the great score !!

\\\"Sometimes the Bird sometimes the statue \\\"

thanks for suggestions, gentlemen!

you can get 760 if you cheat.

thanks Rudeboi! you are not living up to your namesake!! ;)

nodes: I did not keep track of time but I estimate an honest 3 - 4 months. Take the exam when you think you are ready. Good Luck!

3-4 months is a lot of time … I don’t want to spend more than 2 months.

Frank, there is not need to cheat. I think I’d enjoy studying for GMAT.

i think you would too. but k nwoing that cheating is available doesn’t sit well with me.

Books
The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 9 th or 10 th edition
Kaplan book
I bought both but I used the Official guide for the most part.

Prep -
1. Reviewed the concepts section for Math and Verbal for 2 hrs over a couple of days. I spent a little time on figuring out how I planned to solve each section. For example, in Reading Comprehension, should I read the questions first or skim through the passage first. The stratergies in the books sound great, but I just could not seem to fold all these techniques into my method to solve something and still be quick. Simple is better, no?
2. For 3 weeks, 5 days a week I spent 1 hr preparing. I only did practice questions out of the book. Not the exams. I spent 20 mins for Math and 20 for Verbal and split the time equally between all types of questions. I spent the final 20 reviewing my answers. I used a stop watch and stuck to the time limit. In the review, I first scored my work, and marked the incorrect ones. I went back to the incorrect ones and without peeking at the answer tried to pick a new answer and then only did I read the explanation for the answer. I think the explanations helped me prevent some of the mistakes I was likely to repeat.
3. Exam simulation - 1 week before test, 3 tests, 1 a day.
Stick to time limit.
No cheating of any kind.
Complete the essay question at the end.
4. Do the top 10 things to do before exam day - should be similar to the stuff you do for CFA.
5. Exam day - Nothing new today, from breakfast to clothing to pencils. At the exam center, you are not so much in control, so be prepared, like dressing in layers, dont take valuables to the exam hall, request a seat away from anyone else (if possible). Take some ear plugs to the exam center.
I scored a 750.
Good luck.

IMHO, 710-740 range is feasible with 1-2 months prep. For the 760+ scores you need atleast 3 months (unless you are a true genius). GMAT is a need based exam. If you have top-notch workex and solid extra-curricular + prestigious undergrad, then there is no need for the 750+ Get your 710-720 and proceed with your application.

Cheers, Sarthak.

sarthak Wrote:
——————————————————-
> IMHO, 710-740 range is feasible with 1-2 months
> prep. For the 760+ scores you need atleast 3
> months (unless you are a true genius). GMAT is a
> need based exam. If you have top-notch workex and
> solid extra-curricular + prestigious undergrad,
> then there is no need for the 750+ Get your
> 710-720 and proceed with your application.
>
> Cheers, Sarthak.

what schools have you applied / are applying to ?? Candian or US ?

\\\"Sometimes the Bird sometimes the statue \\\"

I am considering applying to Ivey and a few american and european schools. I have a low undergrad engineering gpa that I have to overcome. I am hoping CFA Level 1&2 will help to a certain degree. What about you Rudeboi?

it might be awhile before I apply I want to get levl 3 out of the way first ..

\\\"Sometimes the Bird sometimes the statue \\\"

hi….i am actually wondering if anyone knows where to take a sample GMAT test for free or just do a sample which can guage what your current score would be?

just before I start, it would be beneficial to know the amount of work needed to get a good score..

any help, much appreciated

The best bet for prep is the Kaplan practice exams…nothing prepares you better in my view. Spend roughly 60-80% of your time in verbal by the way. Math tends to go pretty smoothly for those quantitatively-minded people out there.

awesome sarthak
ATB

I personally believe the GMAT is a fairly effective test, even though I’ve had problems with it.
The math section tests for the technical skills common in engineers etc.
The verbal sections tests whether you read enough growing up and whether you have liberal education type skills.
Some people are really smart with verbal, others with math.
The more common type is the math-smart person.
I’m the opposite. Very strong at verbal, terrible at math.
This is coming from someone who took it three times and maxed at 660 (97%V, 48%M)

I was contemplating taking the GMAT at some point, but decided to hold if off. I did take two of hte GMAT powerprep example tests, I thought the verbal was much easier then the GRE verbal and the Quant was perhaps marginally more difficult then the GRE quant. The only substative difference I noticed in material was that it had some basic stat stuff in it….

The quant found in either th GRE or GMAT is not much beyond what you would expect from a High school graduate. It probably won’t take much reviewing to remember most of it, the “problem solving” I saw in the GRE was really really simple, like 9th/10th grade algebra problems about constant rates/proportions etc. Yous hould be fine.

SergeLang Wrote:

> The quant found in either th GRE or GMAT is not
> much beyond what you would expect from a High
> school graduate. It probably won’t take much
> reviewing to remember most of it, the “problem
> solving” I saw in the GRE was really really
> simple, like 9th/10th grade algebra problems about
> constant rates/proportions etc. Yous hould be
> fine.

for those of you with a technical education math is easy. you should not put down those of us who find this stuff difficult by suggesting that any high schooler can do it. maybe where you come from. but some people like myself come from literary-intellectual family backgrounds where math isn’t considered essential.

i have no time for anyone who does not understand the value of a liberal education.

The same people who make the SAT also make the GMAT. Many of the GMAT questions are actually from the same question bank as the SAT. The only math you need to know for the test is arithmetic, algebra and geometry. Honestly, anyone who did a liberal arts education should have at least passed algebra and geometry. In high school.

Well I’m a living, breathing example of someone who did well in Algebra and Geometry classes 8 years ago and can’t crack the math on the gmat. I didn’t do too well on the SAT math either (630M, 690V). Think what you want, but the math section on the GMAT is very tough for those of us without a mathematical predisposition.

I’m sure you think that this makes me stupid. The joke is on you.

Whoa, your freaking out for no reason. I’m giving the guy encouragement. Hey you might not find those questions easy, but with practice, I’m sure they’d become a trivailtiy. Cause honestly, I can only think of two things that may hinder anyone from getting perfect on a exam of that level 1. Time 2. Nervousness. The material is very very simple, and in fact, doing well on that ; IMHO, does not make any strong implications that one is strong in mathematics…. it just indicates that you don’t freak otu on time-standardized tests…..

And I’m not from a “liberal arts” background and I scored in the 97 percentile for the verbal (which is much easier to do then the quant; since even a perfect in quant only usually gets you in the top 92 percentile -in the GRE).

It’s just a simple test… I don’t believe doing well in it indicates anything of merit. The test would have to be muc much much harder to actually guage anythin… and even then, I’d be suspicious. I think standardized exams probably don’t indicate much.

Honestly dude, no one is judging you by your tests cores… and I really don’t think those scores matter. Actually, I don’t really think GPA matters that much; what matters is what you output…. and if output fine things, then that’s all that matters, everything else is a signalling mechanism at best.

But we’re just trying to give the guy some encouragment. And honestly, if the GMAT, is anything like the GRE, a little work will make a huge difference in scores.

Likewise, I don’t see what the big deal is. If your math skills aren’t good, you owe it to yourself to study harder and do better. I think that is pretty prudent advice.

Yeah. Take a chill pill, and then go stuff your head back into a couple of Geometry and Algebra books. While you may have lost some of the cursory use of the principles of each, having previously mastered them in high school should give you an edge when re-learning the concepts. Really, I believe you could bone up your skills over a couple of long weekends of studying.

Not every person with an engineering degree can’t write. And not everyone with an english degree can’t do math. But, if you look at the masses of engineers applying to b-schools, most of them can’t communicate very well. Unfortunately for me and my kind (and unfairly imo) adcoms give the math section more weight in the admission decision.

numi Wrote:
——————————————————-
> Likewise, I don’t see what the big deal is. If
> your math skills aren’t good, you owe it to
> yourself to study harder and do better. I think
> that is pretty prudent advice.

Did that. It didn’t help.

mcthorp Wrote:
——————————————————-
> Yeah. Take a chill pill, and then go stuff your
> head back into a couple of Geometry and Algebra
> books. While you may have lost some of the cursory
> use of the principles of each, having previously
> mastered them in high school should give you an
> edge when re-learning the concepts. Really, I
> believe you could bone up your skills over a
> couple of long weekends of studying.

I studied these concepts all last summer after finishing the CFA L1. To no avail. I raise my % from 45 to 48… and verbal stayed at 97. The third time I took the exam (after more studying) my score dropped 50 points.

Were you to score poorly on the Verbal section, you would study harder to improve your weaknesses, just as you should study more to improve your Quantitative score.

Honestly, if it were me, I would view the low Quant. score as a positive, since re-learning the math necessary for the exam really shouldn’t be too time-intensive as it is just Geometry and Algebra. Be happy that your Verbal section is in good hands: were it the other way around, I would find it much more difficult to improve my vocabulary/reading comprehension/etc. than to re-learn a few basic math concepts.

I’m not trying to be a prick (sometimes it comes naturally), but I think you are in a good position for really improving your GMAT score.

Sorry, I missed your response above. Maybe you should enroll in a community college course for Geometry and/or Algebra and force yourself to really get the principals down. For $500 bucks you can probably take both classes, and then drastically improve your Quant. score. $500 bucks and a few extra hours a week of study are a drop in the bucket compared to the benefits that come from a top tier graduate education.