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40-60-80 Rule

(1) Is this rule official? Could someone give me the link on CFA website on this rule? Thanks.

(2) Should the rule be interpreted as below:

if you are <=50%, then take 40% of the Max Pts in that category
(Does this mean that the rule favors those 1-39% and hurts those 41-50%?)
if you are 51%-70%, then take 60% of the Max Pts in that category
(Does this mean that the rule favors those 51-59% and hurts those 61-70%?)
if you are >70%, then take 80% of the Max Pts in that category
(Does this mean that the rule favors those 71-79% and hurts those 81-100%?)

Divide by the Total number of Pts, which is 240 (120 in the morning and 120 in the afternoon)

This will give you a score for the morning and the afternoon

Average that number to get your total score.

morning: 63%
afternoon: 56%
Total: 59.5%
PASS!

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Yes, this rule is official. I cannot find the link right at this moment, but if you fail and the rule said you should have passed, immediately pay the $100 for a re-tab because clearly something is wrong on CFA’s end.

This is not a CFA technique, it’s an estimation technique designed to give you the average score give or take 10% (on average). The logic is that someone may score based upon the estimate mean per category +/- one STDev of 10%. This is reasonable, considering I heard a stat that few people score over 83% (high range) and I doubt people would pooch screw the lower area scoring much lower than 40% usually (they probably would get 1/3 on average and with a bit of knowledge 40% is reasonable with an incomplete understanding of a topic).

Of course your score could be 10% higher or lower than that average depending on your true scores. I would say if someone scored many lower categories (below 50%) there is a larger potential STDev of that score.