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BS - Feedback on this Ultra?

Saturday when I was in the 40s in the dark, I kept tripping on roots every now and then and stubbing my toe and it would hurt so bad every time. The pain and repercussions of not making the right movements at that point was severe. Never thought a little trip would be a big deal, but in that state the body is so susceptible to breaking in a myriad of ways.

Im actually a little surprised at my recovery Sun morning after how I felt Sat night. 

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Yeah, the last miles are a wild ride.  When I would either stub a toe or semi roll an ankle it felt like getting punched in the gut.  How are the quads today?  Did you have to walk down any steps?  That’s usually the worst.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

I was in a bad state Saturday night. I wanted to pass out in my car but felt unsanitary. And cold. I got home and just turned on the tub and sat in it while some chick was face timing with me as well. I did significant physical therapy and temperature / salt therapy with leg elevation and think that did it.

I feel great today. 

I feel capable of much cycling today, but not sure if HIIT is best for tonight unless solo, so may work out alone tonight as I do feel a bit fragile. I feel really good but feel somewhat aware of certain exercises that might **** me like a lot of Muay Thai knees or something. 

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Sometimes my head coach at the MMA gym says to me: “you feel a lot” - haha

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Just ordered - Cascadia 13 GTX

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Isaiah_53_5 wrote:

Just ordered - Cascadia 13 GTX

Dude you’re killing me.  The point I keep making goretex is terrible for running shoes.  Lol.  Goretex fabric is hotter in general so your feet will suffer in non wet conditions.  In real wet conditions that you will encounter (high mud, creeks, or frequent deep puddles, even rain where water runs down your legs into the shoe) the water will simply be held in and won’t drain.  The shoes take forever to dry so if you’re running a long race and it started wet and then dried out, your shoes will stay wet.  Which in addition to swamp foot also means your shoes will stay heavy.  Goretex generally is the worst move a trailrunner can make on a shoe.  People at the store think trail running involves a jog through the park will rave about them because its a $40 upsell but they’re just not good all purpose running shoes.  Better to use normal fabric upper with wool socks. 

http://www.atrailrunnersblog.com/2005/05/be-wary-of-gore-tex-running-sho...

“Gore-Tex running shoes are so badly flawed in this regard that I once thought they should be called the worst-ever use of technology in outdoor gear. Then I took a pair for a run on the paved path around Seattle’s Green Lake in a light rain. None of the puddles were more than an inch deep.

If this is your idea of a “trail run,” then fine, the shoes work. And if Runners World magazine, a publication more devoted to life on the trail than off, wants to declare these shoes sweet on your feet, OK.

But outdoor publications like Outside are supposed to be offering advice to people who actually get Outside - at least out to where the pavement ends and the trails begins to get wet and muddy.

And this is where Gore-Tex running shoes are at their worst. It is only 4 inches from the bottom of a running shoe to the cutout around the ankle. I know; I measured.

It is unbelievably easy to find puddles or mud holes that deep. You step in. The shoe fills up. That’s it. Your feet will be soaked for the rest of the day.

Well-ventilated trail shoes made with open-mesh uppers are far better than Gore-Tex in these conditions.”

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

To me, if you’re just going to buy another goretex then I would have kept the original shoes because that was the biggest issue with them.  I don’t have a strong view of Cascadia vs Terra.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

Oh - I wasn’t aware GTX meant Gore Tex - I thought it just meant ‘better’

lol oops

It is clear to me now. I get it. 

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

I haven’t opened the box - its still at the front desk. I can just send them back or something and get the regulars. 

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

I like the look of the regular ones better anyway - specifically the black and orange… sick

Cascadia 13

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

There was one aspect of the Ultra race that I was not expecting to encounter. Confusion. 

At the end of the race, I was navigating for miles on my own in the dark with low food and low water and really had issues figuring out what the **** was going on. It was like the cogs in my brain were moving slower. I missed one of the markers and got lost and everything was just so complicated at that point. 

Complicated in the sense that … I was lost … but I had to keep moving to avoid getting cold. I couldn’t move that fast, but I had to move fast enough to stay warm. I didn’t even think I would go through these stages in the race, but it definitely was an experience. 

And then coming back to appreciate the simple things in life as you said above. 

— 

I am looking for a shoe that drains well for that 50K race in January - I want to be prepared. 

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Those Gore Tex Adidas shoes were money for Colorado this month though. 

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Black Swan wrote:

Yeah, the last miles are a wild ride.

I didn’t get to do the 50K due to knee issues and my friend who was running with me spontaneously decided to try for a 100M Ultra on Dec 29 and he got 70.95mi in and he had some knee issue and DNF. 

Overall though, these races are really not what I thought they would be. I still think about that 50M and how it has tempered me as an athlete (in a good way).

But, what I really came to this thread to say was that you were right BS — these Ultras are definitely something else.

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford

Isaiah_53_5 wrote:

Black Swan wrote:

Yeah, the last miles are a wild ride.

I didn’t get to do the 50K due to knee issues and my friend who was running with me spontaneously decided to try for a 100M Ultra on Dec 29 and he got 70.95mi in and he had some knee issue and DNF. 

Overall though, these races are really not what I thought they would be. I still think about that 50M and how it has tempered me as an athlete (in a good way).

But, what I really came to this thread to say was that you were right BS — these Ultras are definitely something else.

No worries man, was trying to prepare you for it realistically, was hoping for the best.  But yeah, those races stick with you, if you ever start doing them regularly even just focusing on the 50K-50M distance like I did vs the crazy long ones, they’ll definitely shape your maturity in how you approach physical challenges, at least they did for me.  Plus they really hone your logistical planning abilities because you start considering little details.

On an unrelated note, my four year old just skied her first black diamond runs today at Vail, was pretty epic.  She didn’t even want me leading, asked if she could just try one and then skied down them like it was second nature, no falls.

#FreeCVM #FreeTurd #2007-2017

damn that’s amazing about your daughter on black diamonds ///// badass ……. must feel awesome / proud as a father 

The Ultra distance sports are just not something that I imagined them to be. Not necessarily better or worse, but just different. I had met some Ultra athletes in the past who were exceptional athletes; maybe I took their humility a bit too much for granted . Because, the sport does really demand everything from you. I felt a ‘straightening’ of my mind that day, in a sense of being closer towards my personal truth that I felt in life. And to that extent it was a success for no matter how many miles I ran. It was my first marathon distance that day and in my calculations it was just a 10hr activity or something (which I failed to keep pace for at a specific point), and then I later realized it was less about me holding pace and more about just actually hitting 50M - as you said ‘distance is the PR’ in Ultras. 

But, it did put me on the radar, so the nod of humility that I get from another bro at Whole Foods is understood by both parties (ie if he did 100M). I’m the informed Ultra wannabe now versus the uninformed cookie cutter triathlete. This mentality though has bloomed much in the past 6 months or so and it all really started with the couple 70.3s last year and then the 48 mile mind**** (well I’d say 35-48), just as BS predicted… lol

cheers

"A theory that you can't explain to a bartender is probably no damn good."
- Ernest Rutherford