How to get into a firm's annual analyst meeting

Do you guys (particularly those in Research) have any tips on how us commoners can weasel our way into a firm’s annual analyst meeting? all tips appreciated – thanks.

Invent a firm, start showing up at industry conferences, get to know the company’s IR representatives, and get on their mailing lists. I’ve gotten invited to so many more company and hedge fund analyst meetings than I care to just by virtue of giving my business card to the IR rep.

?!? analyst days are so widely attended I can’t imagine it that hard to get in. Then again I work on the buy-side so maybe that’s why I never thought much about it.

I think they’re silly and unfair. The CFAI should look at the ethics behind them. I remember something in the code or standards about avoiding the appearance of impropriety. Having a NON-PUBLIC meeting “by-invitation only” is definitely WRONG.

Just show up in a suit and you should be fine. You might have to pass by the registration desk, in which case you can just give them a made-up business card with a fake name and some bogus asset management firm (most asset managers are pretty bogus to begin with, so it’s not like you’d be committing a capital crime anyway). Analyst meetings and investor days are technically open to the public, because they often disclose material information; and under the SEC rules, if it’s material information that’s disclosed to some, it should be disclosed to all.

Anybody read Warren Buffet’s biography? He used to just show up at company offices and ask to speak to someone inside. This was back when he was an early 20’s and a nobody. By he own description he was physically and socially immature, dressed badly and generally looked very geeky. He almost always talked his way in to seeing senior managament, often CEO. He showed up at GEICO on a Saturday when it was just starting out. Got talking to a manager there for hours, liked the story and the rest is history. So forget attending analyst meetings uninvited, you should be looking for a 3 hour one-on-one with the CEO uninvited! As for actual analyst days, there are always admin staff on the door checking your name to tick off their list. Inevitably they’ll have a table full of name tags in front of them. If you arrive a few minutes late you could just say you were one of the remaining names and hope that person doesn’t show up. That is the slightly risky version. Of course everything Numi said is true and much less likely to land you in trouble. But where’s the fun in that?

the warren buffet story is special. i dont’ think most major firms would entertain that sort of thing. also, in the story, the person that spoke to buffet had no intention of actually telling him anything important until he was impressed. but i watn to attend some annual meetings. i think i’ll just go. what are they going to do?

Thanks for the tips. On that note, how the heck do I figure out where they are physically having it? I may just be an incompetent googler but I swear i’ve spent 30 mins searching XOM and CVX’s analyst days and cant find the info (found when but not where).

thems Wrote: ------------------------------------------------------- > Thanks for the tips. > > On that note, how the heck do I figure out where > they are physically having it? > > I may just be an incompetent googler but I swear > i’ve spent 30 mins searching XOM and CVX’s analyst > days and cant find the info (found when but not > where). To find the location of these meetings, you probably need one of those devices like they have on “Lost” that they use to find the moving island. They usually send these out to big corporation’s analysts who gleefully put it on their desk as a nice paperweight. Most people think it is just another one of those hanging metal devices that draws circular lines in the sand, but they have no idea.

Usually they’re in a press release (edit: sometimes smaller companies don’t advertise so just call them and tell them you’re an asset manager with some made up firm)

call or email their ir person and say you work for a buy-side shop, want to attend the analyst day.